Where is Waldo???

Thursday, April 10, 2008

Every since I was a kid I can remember playing a game of hide and seek (well sort of) with this character named Waldo. Waldo would hide in some picture or book and my charge was t find him. Sometimes he hid very well. As it turns out all this time I was looking for the wrong thing Waldo is not a character dressed in a stocking cap and red and white striped shirt. Waldo is a building. Can you guess where I found Waldo??? -SG



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Busy March

Sunday, April 6, 2008

It would seem that the month of March may go down as one of the busiest on record for the Gatherum Family. Each day was often filled with more things to do than we collectively had time to accomplish. To Top it off during spring break I was sent to a class in Tyson's Corner, Virginia for work. During the last day of the six day class I was able to catch the metro and spend four hours or so seeing the sights of Washington DC. Here are some of the photos I took on my quick tour. While it was far from an ideal weather day for taking pictures (45 - 50 degrees F with low clouds as in sitting on the city almost fog like with drizzle rain with very low visibility.) Sorry again for the lack of post but some months are like that. --SG

District of Columbia World War Memorial
Location: on the Mall south of 19th Street NW, West Potomac Park
Building Stone: Vermont marble
Remarks: The memorial was a gift of the citizens of Washington to honor those who died during World War I; it was authorized in 1924 and dedicated on November 11, 1931.

White House
Location: 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue NW
Building Stones: Exterior, Virginia Aquia Creek sandstone refinished with Maryland marble and other marbles; fence base, north side, Montgomery County, Maryland crystalline rocks; fence capping, Aquia Creek sandstone
Remarks: Designed by James Hoban and begun in 1792, the White House was the first public building to be erected in Washington. It was first occupied in 1800 by President and Mrs. John Adams; after being burned by the British in 1814, it was rebuilt and reoccupied by 1818. The interior was completely rebuilt in 1948-52 to repair structural weaknesses.

Washington Monument
Location: On the Mall, Constitution Avenue and 15th Street NW
Building Stones: Exterior, upper part, Cockeysville, Md., marble; lower part, Texas, Md., marble; courses in between, Lee, Mass., marble; interior backing, Seneca, Md., sandstone and Maryland crystalline rocks; foundation, Little Falls, Md., crystalline rocks
Remarks: Designed by Robert Mills, who also designed the Treasury Building, the monument stands at more than 555 feet and is one of the tallest masonry structures in the world. Because of delays and complications, which included lack of money, difficulties with the original foundation, and the theft of books and records of the society that was funding and supervising the building, the construction spanned 37 years and was not completed until 1885.


Smithsonian Institution Main Building (the Castle)
Location: 1000 Jefferson Drive SW
Building Stones: Seneca, Md., sandstone
Remarks: The Smithsonian Institution was founded in 1829 with a bequest of James Smithson, a British mineralogist and chemist, who had never been to this country. This building, now the administrative headquarters, is the oldest of the Smithsonian buildings on the Mall. It was designed by James Renwick in the Gothic Revival or Romantic style and was completed in 1855.

Lincoln Memorial
Location: Between Independence Avenue SW and Constitution Avenue NW in West Potomac Park at 23d Street NW
Building Stones: Reflecting pool, North Carolina granite; foundation steps, Massachusetts granite; memorial building, Colorado marble; statue, Georgia marble; base of statue and floors, Tennessee marble; columns and lintels, Indiana limestone
Remarks: The structure was designed in the style of a Greek temple, with 36 Doric columns representing the 36 States of the Union at the time of Lincoln's death; the statue of Lincoln was by Daniel Chester French. More than 50,000 people attended the dedication ceremonies in 1922, including Robert Todd Lincoln, the President's only surviving son.

Vietnam Veterans Memorial
Location: Constitution Gardens, between Constitution Avenue and the Reflecting Pool
Building Stone: Black granite quarried near Bangalore, India; cut and fabricated in Barre, Vermont; and sandblasted in Memphis, Tennessee
Remarks: A competition was held to select the design for this memorial to men and women who served during the Vietnam War; the winning design was created by Maya Ying Lin, a 21-year-old architecture student at Yale University. The memorial was dedicated in 1982. In 1984, an American flag and a sculpture showing three servicemen were added to the memorial. In 1993, the Vietnam Women's Memorial was added to represent the work of the women veterans.
Commodore John Paul Jones (1747-1792) was a young Scotsman who migrated to the United States in 1775 and joined the fledgling U.S. Navy. He entered the legends of the American military when fighting the British ship Serapis off the coast of England. When the enemy captain called out to Jones to surrender his ship the Bonhomme Richard, Jones replied, "Surrender? I have not yet begun to fight!"

The World War II Memorial honors the 16 million who served in the armed forces of the U.S., the more than 400,000 who died, and all who supported the war effort from home. Symbolic of the defining event of the 20th Century, the memorial is a monument to the spirit, sacrifice, and commitment of the American people. The Second World War is the only 20th Century event commemorated on the National Mall’s central axis.

The World War II Memorial honors the 16 million who served in the armed forces of the U.S., the more than 400,000 who died, and all who supported the war effort from home. Symbolic of the defining event of the 20th Century, the memorial is a monument to the spirit, sacrifice, and commitment of the American people. The Second World War is the only 20th Century event commemorated on the National Mall’s central axis.

Korean War Veterans Memorial
Location: The National Mall between Independence Avenue and the Reflecting Pool
Building Stones: Wall was made of "Academy Black" granite from California, sand blasted in Cold Spring, Minnesota, with more than 2,500 photographic, archival images from the war; on the base of the pool highly reflective black granite from Canada
Remarks: A design was created by a team from State College, Pennsylvania, and later revised by Cooper-Lecky Architects. The memorial was dedicated on July 27, 1995, the 42nd anniversary of the armistice that ended the Korean War.

*Monument Information

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